Citational Fragments

Loie Fuller – Oyster

I say unto you: one must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a
dancing star. I say unto you: you still have chaos in yourselves.
—Nietzsche, “Zarathustra’s Prologue”

With every event, there is indeed the present moment of its actualization, the
moment in which the event is embodied in a state of affairs, an individual, or a
person, the moment we designate by saying ‘here, the moment has come’. The future
and the past of the event are only evaluated with respect to this definitive present.
On the other hand, there is the future and past of the event considered in itself,
sidestepping each present, being free of the limitations of a state of affairs,
impersonal, pre-individual, neutral.

Text reproduced from http://www2.selu.edu/Academics/Faculty/jbell/doublebind.pdf. Image reproduced from https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/287807 (accessed 30/03/22)

The Mind at 3 miles an hour

Frank van De Ven, Body Landscape Residency, 2011

Frank Van de Ven, Body Landscape Residency, 2011

“The multiplication of technologies in the name of efficiency is actually eradicating free time by making it possible to maximize the time and place for production and minimize the unstructured travel time in between…Too, the rhetoric of efficiency around these technologies suggests that what cannot be quantified cannot be valued-that that vast array of pleasures which fall into the category of doing nothing in particular, of woolgathering, cloud-gazing, wandering, window-shopping, are nothing but voids to be filled by something more definite, more production, or faster-paced…I like walking because it is slow, and I suspect that the mind, like the feet, works at about three miles an hour. If this is so, then modern life is moving faster than the speed of thought or thoughtfulness.” Rebecca Solnit

Text reproduced from http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/497587-the-multiplication-of-technologies-in-the-name-of-efficiency-is 08052014

One step forward/Two steps back (anon, anon, anon) – Three Steps into 2017

Left: Found Text in Samuel Butler Exhibition Catalogue 'Travelling the Way of All Flesh', Right: Robert Edwin Peary at the North pole by an unknown photographer.

Left: Found Text in Samuel Butler Exhibition Catalogue ‘Travelling the Way of All Flesh’, Right: Robert Edwin Peary at the North pole by an unknown photographer.

“We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time.”

Yours for a resolute 2017

Extract from T.S Eliot’s Little Gidding, the last of Eliot’s Four Quartets, 1942. Quote reproduced from http://www.columbia.edu/itc/history/winter/w3206/edit/tseliotlittlegidding.html

The Nature of Life – John Ruskin meets Joan Miro

Joan Miro, Barcelona, Carborundum Print, 1970, 75 x 105cm

Joan Miro, Barcelona, Carborundum Print, 1970, 75 x 105cm

A thought for the new year:

“The foxglove tells us that our life is a whole, consisting of youth and age, of flowering moments and dying moments, of buds and seeds, of uses and needs. It is not one big blossom, but a whole plant. Its wealth resides in its wholeness and the relationships of all its parts to the whole. The dust gathers to make foxgloves, you and me. We too can shape the dust. What shape will that be…?” John Ruskin

What shape will you be?

Image reproduced from http://www.printed-editions.com/art-print/joan-miro-barcelona-20174

Merry Christmas Everybodies/Thanks for following

Winter Path © Denise Startin

“Did I Love a dream?”

My doubt, accumulation of a former night, ends up
As many a subtle branch, that having remained the true
Woods themselves, proves, alas! that I offered myself alone.”

Extract from “L’après-midi d’un faune”, The Afternoon of a Faun 1875 by Stéphane Mallarmé, quoted in The Poetics of Occasion, Mallarmé and the Poetry of Circumstance, Marian Zwerling Sugano, Stanford University Press, California, 1992:pp.38.